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Nibutani atsutoushi


Woven textiles

It reached lawn Nagarekawa basin for a long time, and business with other areas was carried out as product of lawn Nagarekawa basin in the Edo era.

A tradition of the Saru River basin region since ancient times. It was used in trade with other regions as a product of the Saru River basin during the Edo period.


Tokoname Yaki

Tokoname Ware


We can sail up until last years of Heian era, and model of Tokoname Yaki which is said to be old Tokoname Yaki is counted in one of Japanese six Old kilns. In the Heian era, we put thing which we wrote sutra of Buddhism and buried in the underground, and scripture mound pot (kyozukatsubo) to pray for benefit was made.

Pieces representing the beginnings of Tokoname Yaki were made at the end of the Heian period (794-1185) and it is now counted among Japan's six old kilns. During the Heian period, Kyozuka urns were made in which to put Buddhist sutras before burial in the ground as a way of asking favors of the Buddha. During the Muromachi period (1392-1573), the pottery produced mainly tea bowls and other tea ceremony items as well as ikebana flower vases. Jars appeared in the middle of the Edo period (1600-1868) and normal household tableware started to be produced at the end of the Edo period alongside the prized tea ceremony pieces. Sanitary items such as drain-pipes, wash-hand basin and toilets, tiles and plant pots were added to the list of products in the Meiji period (1868-1912). Undoubtedly the vast range of products available today is the result of being a production center with plentiful supplies of good quality clay to hand, and because of the area's ability to change its line of main products in step with demand down through history.


Kishiwara Yaki

Koishiwara Ware


It is the Chikuzen opened in earlier period of Edo era in the 17th century by Kuroda feudal clan feudal lord's first kiln.

The kiln set up by the feudal lord of the local Kuroda clan, in the 17th century at the beginning of the Edo period (1600-1868), was the first to be set up in Chikuzen in northern Kyushu. Large porcelain urns, jars and sake flasks were made under the name of Nakano yaki but in the middle of the 18th century, pottery was being produced under the name of Koishiwara Yaki.


Hakata Ori

Hakata Textiles

Woven textiles

In the Kamakura era, Hakata merchant passes to Chugoku of the times of Soong with priest, and it does by opening to have taken Woven textiles technology home with.

During the Kamakura period (1185-1333), merchants from Hakata journeyed to Sung dynasty China with the founder of Joten-ji temple, Shoichi Kokushi, and the weaving techniques they brought back with them laid the foundations of Hakata Ori.


Akama Suzuri

Akama Inkstones

Writing tools and Abacus

Akama Suzuri has record dedicated to Tsurugaoka Hachiman-gu at the beginning of the Kamakura era. We were extended the market in each place in the middle of Edo era.

Records exist showing that an Akama Suzuri was offered at the Tsuruoka Hachimangu Shrine in Kamakura at the beginning of the Kamakura period (1185-1333). By the middle of the Edo period (1600-1868) these inkstones were being sold up and down the country.


Amakusa Tojiki

Amakusa Pottery and Porcelain


In Imperial demesne Amakusa, person of village headman of each village of Shimauchi demanded way of self-support of villager from the Sue work, and porcelain and earthenware were baked from the middle in the Edo early days.

In the old fief of Amakusa on the island of Kyushu, the village headmen encouraged the people throughout the fief to try and support themselves by making pottery and from the early 17th century and on into the 18th century, both pottery and porcelain were being produced in the province.


Hakata Ningyo

Hakata Art Dolls

Dolls and Kokeshi

The history of Hakata Ningyo is old and sails up at the beginning of the 17th century.

According to some people, the history of Hakata Ningyo dates back to the beginning of the 17th century. It seems that when Kuroda Nagamasa built Fukuoka castle, someone making ridge-end tiles for the castle developed his skills with forming and firing, and he gave one of the figures he made to the head of the clan.


Izushi Yaki

Izushi Ware


Because uncut stone of a large quantity of white porcelain was discovered in hometown in the middle of Edo era, we receive support of feudal lord and invite ceramist of present Arita-cho, Saga, and it is done with opening what made porcelain in castle town of Izushi.

Large quantities of kaolin were discovered in the area during the 18th century. With the help of the local feudal lord, potters skilled in the making of porcelain from Arita in present-day Saga Prefecture were brought in to help, and the porcelain made in the castle town of Izushi marked the beginnings of this ware. Subsequently, the number of kilns increased in and around this castle town and a production center became established.


Kishu Herazao

Kishu Herazao

Woodcraft, Bamboo Craftwork

Kishu Herazao is fishing rod for spatula crusian carp made with high technology of master of pole.

Kishu Herazao are fishing rods for catching crucian carp created by master rod craftsmen.


Echigo Sanjo Uchihamono

Echigo Sanjo Uchi Hamono

Metalworking product

As tool necessary for agriculture, it produced "sickle" "hoes" from the Middle Ages, and, after the "sum nail" which began as side business of farmhouse of off-season making of, "kitchen knife" "plane" "chisel" "pruning shears" "beginning to talk knife" "masakari" came to make various kinds of dajimbutsu.

Production of essential farm implements such as sickles and hoes have been in production since the middle ages. Creation of Japanese nails began as a side job for farmers in the off season, and this evolved into the creation of many types of blades including kitchen knives, planes for carving wood, chisels, pruning shears, utility knives, axes, and more types of blades.


Osaka Ranma

Osaka Transoms

Woodcraft, Bamboo Craftwork

As for the beginning of Osaka Ranma, technique to become the cause of the tradition technique is seen in St. Kanja or Shitenno-ji Temple in Osaka in the early 17th century.

The origins of this craft date back to the beginning of the 17th century and the traditional woodworking skills that can be seen at Osaka's Hijiri Shrine and Shiteno-ji temple. Gradually during the 18th century, transoms were mainly introduced into merchant's houses not only for practical reasons of ventilation and lighting but also as a decorative element capable of raising the quality of interior space, especially in rooms where guest would be received.


Iga Yaki

Iga Ware


Opening dates back to the eighth century from the late seventh century. Earthenware vessel called earthen vessel is baked, too, and unglazed pottery for agriculture was made while it is the beginning, but is when tile of temple was made in the Asuka era.

The origins of this ware date back to sometime between the second half of the 7th century and 8th century A.D. At the time, a type of earthenware called sueki was being fired and in the early days, seed pots used by farmers were being made. Subsequently, however, it seems that temple roof tiles were produced.