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TRADITIONAL CRAFTS

Yamagata

Yamagata Butsudan

Yamagata Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

Because was in the middle of the Edo era, and came to trade safflower; of person from the Kyoto area became busy, and Household Buddhist Altars , culture of the making of Household Buddhist Fittings entered at Kyoto.

By the middle of the Edo period (1600-1868), the number of people travelling to and from Kyoto had increased because of the trade in such crops as safflower from Yamagata. As a result, Buddhist altar culture found its way into the area.

Niigata

Niigata Shirone Butsudan

Niigata Shirone Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

It is in the middle of the Edo era and expert building temple called Rev. Buddhist monastery (do ding-dong) adopts skills and techniques from Kyoto and makes Household Buddhist Altars of Kyoto form, and what completed "unvarnished wood (shiraki) Household Buddhist Altars " which we put sculpture easy by hand of oneself for more does by opening.

A specialist, who was responsible for building a temple, introduced various skills and techniques from Kyoto to the area in the middle of the Edo period (1600-1868) and made Kyoto style household Buddhist altars. He also made a plain wooden altar, carving it in a simple manner himself. This was to be the forerunner of Niigata Shirone Butsudan.

Niigata

Nagaoka Butsudan

Nagaoka Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

It is informed by each places of the whole country Nagaoka Butsudan with the opening that carpenter specializing in building shrines and temples, master craftsman of Buddhist image, engraver, painter (master) who gathered dealt with Household Buddhist Altars production as side job during winter to build temple, main shrine in area around Nagaoka-shi in the about 17th century. In the early 19th century, Household Buddhist Altars came to be managed as local industry.

During the 17th century, a number of temples and shrines were built in and around the city of Nagaoka. It seems that the specialist carpenters, sculptors of Buddhist images, sculptors of other carved elements and lacquerers who had come into the area from all over the country because of this building work, started making household Buddhist altars during the winter months.

Niigata

Sanjyo Butsudan

Sanjo Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

Article 3 district was said to be "French capital Article 3", and it was in the middle, and, in prosperous land of Buddhism, temple which had hall Buddhist monastery (do not feel that how about) said to be the Hokuriku first was built in the Edo era.

The area known as Sanjo has always been strongly associated with Buddhism, sometimes known as the ""capital"" of the faith. This is partly evidenced by the building during the 18th century of the Hokuriku region's finest piece of temple architecture.

Nagano

Iiyama Butsudan

Iiyama Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

As for the making of Household Buddhist Altars which rooted in town Iiyama of temple from the early period of Edo era, work is subdivided and is produced from parts to assembling consistently in area. Around Household Buddhist Altars shop which should be called production wholesale dealer of Household Buddhist Altars which served as Rev. finish, production center is comprised.

The making of Buddhist household altars became firmly established in the thriving religious community of Iiyama during the beginning of the 17th century. All of the work was done in the area by different craftsmen and then the whole thing was assembled.

Ishikawa

Kanazawa Butsudan

Kanazawa Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

Beginning of Kanazawa Butsudan can date back until the 17th century.

It is possible to trace the origins of Kanazawa Butsudan back to the 17th century. What prompted their production was the sheer number of people who had been converted to the Jodo Shinshu in the Hokuriku region of Japan, after Rennyo-shonin, a Buddhist priest of the same order visited the area to spread the word.

Ishikawa

Nanao Butsudan

Nanao Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

Words to be connected with the making of Household Buddhist Altars such as lacquer work tool and gold dust, coloring with thin gold leaf tool, gold silver foil were written in ancient documents.

Various words associated with the making of household Buddhist altars appear in an ancient document called Ofuregaki between 1613 and 1703. In one dating back to 1688, there is mention of maki-e-dogu, kinpun and kirigane, all things associated with maki-e decorative lacquer techniques or gilding. There is also a reference to silver leaf in the same document dating back to 1669.

Aichi

Nagoya Butsudan

Nagoya Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

It was supported by warm Buddhism faith, and, in this district where the skill made with Household Buddhist Altars grew early, specialty store has already existed early in the Edo era.

Fostered by a strong belief in Buddhism, the making of these altars developed early in the area and even at the beginning of the Edo period, specialist stores dealing in home altars already existed. Skills were collectively honed by the groups of craftsmen that were created after wholesale groups were established and traditional methods and techniques were cultivated.

Aichi

Mikawa Butsudan

Mikawa Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

Beginning of Mikawa Butsudan dates back to the middle of Edo era. maridato is said to be good timber of pine, cedar, hinoki that Rev. Household Buddhist Altars is provided using transportation by water of the Yahagi River having made Household Buddhist Altars as materials with lacquer produced in the foot of Sanage (there does not seem to be monkey) in northern Mikawa at the beginning.

Mikawa Butsudan date back to the middle of the 18th century. It was then that a certain altar maker made an altar using good pine, cedar and cypress that was brought down the Yasakugawa river and finished his work using natural lacquer tapped from trees at the foot of Mt. Sarunage in the north of Mikawa.

Aichi

Owari Household Buddhist Fittings

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

Industrial art object that Owari Household Buddhist Fittings is produced around Nagoya-shi, Aichi from early period of Edo era. We developed into resources as side job of low-class samurai of high quality wood produced in the suburbs of Owari in last part of Edo era. Wooden lacquering product is the center and features a variety of processes and the colorful finish.

Shiga

Hikone Butsudan

Hikone Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

Because it was in the middle of the Edo era and recommended to armorer, painter (master), worker with high technique in Hikone feudal clan to leave production of arms, and to be engaged in production of Household Buddhist Altars , the making of Household Buddhist Altars began as small household industry from that time.

Gradually during the 18th century, highly skilled armorers, lacquerers and other artisans were encouraged by the Hikone clan to work on the making of household altars, at first more or less as a ""cottage industry"". Subsequently with the rise in popularity of Buddhism and the patronage of the Hikone clan, a production center became established, forming the foundations of the small craft industry as it exists today.

Kyoto

Kyo Butsudan

Kyoto Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

Household Buddhist Altars was thing which varied from Buddhist altar (zushi) to, but was used as thing of samurai exclusively.

Household Buddhist altars were a variation of miniature shrines called zushi and were originally used exclusively by the warrior classes. It is thought that the production of ordinary household altars began in earnest with an increase in the numbers of people requiring one at the beginning of the Edo period (1600-1868), when the Tokugawa Shogunate introduced new religious policies.