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TRADITIONAL CRAFTS

Hokkaido

Nibutani atsutoushi

Nibutani-attus

Woven textiles

It reached lawn Nagarekawa basin for a long time, and business with other areas was carried out as product of lawn Nagarekawa basin in the Edo era.

A tradition of the Saru River basin region since ancient times. It was used in trade with other regions as a product of the Saru River basin during the Edo period.

Yamagata

Oitama Tsumugi

Oitama Pongee

Woven textiles

Beginning of Oitama Tsumugi dates back to the early eighth century. Firstly the system as production center was set in what Kagekatsu Uesugi of feudal lord recommended in the Edo era.

While dating back to the 8th century, the weaving of this cloth did not become firmly established in this area of Yamagata Prefecture until the beginning of the 17th century. This was when Uesugi Keisho, the lord of the fief, encouraged its weaving.

Yamagata Niigata

Uetsu Shinafu

Uetsu Shinafu

Woven textiles

In Japan, we made thread with fiber which we took out of the trees and plants such as course (we die), Paper mulberry (we ask), elm (similar), wisteria (wisteria), kudzu (waste), ramie (choma) which grew wild distantly in the fields and mountains from Jomon and Yayoi period and we finished weaving on cloth as private use and used to clothes or accessories.

In Japan, ever since the Jomon and Yayoi periods, people have made thread from fiber derived from plants and trees that grow naturally in the mountains such as Japanese linden, mulberry, elm, wisteria, kudzu, and ramie, and used this thread to weave fabric and make clothing and ornaments for private home use.

Ibaraki Tochigi

Yuki Tsumugi

Yuki Pongee

Woven textiles

In the Yuki, Ibaraki district, sericulture business was prosperous for a long time, and pongee was made as the use of by-product in the slack season for farmers and has already put in the Imperial Court in the Nara era.

The Yuki area of Ibaraki Prefecture had been a center for sericulture since ancient times. Based on this, Yuki Tsumugi was woven during slack periods of the farming year and cloth was supplied to the Imperial Court during the Nara period (710-794).

Gunma

Isesaki Kasuri

Isesaki Kasuri

Woven textiles

The history of Isesaki Kasuri can date back to the ancient times, but it is the late 17th century, and it is after that production center was formed.

Although the history of Isesaki Kasuri dates back to ancient times, it was not until the latter half of the 17th century that a production center for these cloths became established. Also, from the middle of the 19th century right up until relatively recent times, these cloths were known throughout Japan as Isesaki meisen.

Gunma

Kiryu Ori

Kiryu Textiles

Woven textiles

Foamy fall princess serving the Imperial Court in old days as 1200 comes to bride in the Yamadas of Kiryu, and what conveyed sericulture and plane (hata) texture to villager is said to be opening.

It is said that Kiryu Ori go back some 1,200 years, to when Princess Shirataki, who served at the Imperial Court, went to live in Kiryu after she married into the Yamada family and taught the art of sericulture and weaving to the people of the village.

Saitama

Chichibu Meisen

Chichibu Meisen

Woven textiles

As for the origin, original in 1908 in the Edo era; "understand; acquired patent in textile printing" technique, and reached the prosperity.

This textile originated in the Edo period, and in 1908, the unique hogushi nassen dyeing technique was patented, and the craft prospered.

Tokyo

Murayama Oshima Tsumugi

Murayama Oshima Fabrics

Woven textiles

Beginning of Murayama Oshima Tsumugi is said to be in the latter half of the Edo era.

While the history of this kimono cloth only seems to date back to the middle of the 19th century, it was in 1920 that the techniques associated with two different cloths were combined to produce the silk cloth known as Murayama Oshima Tsumugi.

Tokyo

Honba Kihachijo

Kihachijo Fabrics

Woven textiles

In the old days, Norinaga Motoori left with "zururamukashi where the name of island called pseudo hachijo-silk was than that hachijo-silk".

It seems that the island of Kihachijo got its name from the Hachijo cloth, and the island was a supplier of silk right back in the Muromachi period (1392-1573). Since the middle of the 18th century, very elegant striped and checked cloths have been woven on the island, and these kimono cloths and obi still have many followers today.

Tokyo

Tama Ori

Tama Fabrics

Woven textiles

In area equal to current Hachioji, silk was woven from end of the Heian era, and there was Woven textiles such as Takiyama pongee and Yokoyama pongee.

Two silk cloths known as Takiyama pongee and Yokoyama pongee were being made toward the end of the 12th century, in the area of present-day Hachioji on the western edge of Tokyo.

Niigata

Shiozawa Tsumugi

Shiozawa Pongee

Woven textiles

The history of Woven textiles of Shiozawa production center of Niigata is old, and our local hemp cloth (current fine linen) woven in the Nara era is stored in Shoso-in of Nara.

The history of weaving in the Shiozawa area is very long and an example of a linen cloth--now Echigo linen--woven during the Nara period (710-794) is preserved in the Shosoin Repository in Nara. The skills and techniques used to weave this linen cloth were adopted for the weaving of a silk cloth that became Shiozawa Tsumugi and was first woven during the Edo period (1600-1868).

Niigata

Ojiya Chijimi

Ojiya Ramie Crepe

Woven textiles

The history of hemp cloth in Ojiya is old, and trace of the texture is left to earthenware vessel thought to be last part of Jomon period.

The history of linen weaving in Ojiya goes back a very long time. A piece of pottery which is thought to have been made at the end of the Jomon period (ca.10000-ca.200 BC) has been discovered bearing the imprint of some woven fabric. Well suited to the climate of Ojiya, woven linen was valued highly and was presented to the Shogun.