• Home
  • DENSAN Search

DENSAN Search

TRADITIONAL CRAFTS

Tokyo

Tokyo Some Komon

Tokyo Fine-Pattern Dyeing

Dyed Textiles

Beginning of fine pattern can date back to the Muromachi era, but it is the Edo era, and it is after that fine pattern came to be dyed widely.

Although the history of this craft can be traced back to the Muromachi period (1392-1573), it was not until the Edo period (1600-1868) that cloth of this type was produced in any quantity. Stencil-dyed cloths were especially used for the kamishimo, a piece of formal dress worn by the Daimyo. These regional feudal lords were required to reside in Edo for long periods and the resulting increase in demand for this cloth made Edo the center of its production. Originally, it was only the Daimyo and samurai classes who wore garments of this cloth.

Tokyo

Tokyo Tegaki Yuzen

Tokyo Yuzen Dyeing

Dyed Textiles

It was in the middle of the Edo era, and products from the Kansai area said to be "outbound thing" gathered in Edo where culture and economy prospered together as the center of military administration a lot. Of such times there are many personal dyers (dye, and do) of daimyo, and one comes to move to Edo to drift,

By the 18th century, Edo was the center of political power of the Shogunate and the culture and economy of this metropolis that later became Tokyo flourished.

Ishikawa

Kaga Yuzen

Kaga Yuzen Dyeing

Dyed Textiles

Beginning of Kaga Yuzen sails up to "umesen" (umezome) which is dyeing technique peculiar to Kaga. It is written down for documents that there has been already "umesen" in middle part of the 15th century.

The origins of Kaga Yuzen go back to a type of dyeing called ume-zome, which was unique to the area. This dyeing technique already existed in the middle of the 15th century and can be verified through written records. Besides ume-zome, other very old methods of dyeing called kenbo-zome and iro-emon are also part of Kaga's legacy of dyeing and went under the general heading of okuni-zome.

Aichi

Arimatsu Narumi Shibori

Arimatsu Narumi Shibori

Dyed Textiles

Technique itself of shibori is thing which began in the Nara era, but it is the time at the beginning of the Edo era that Arimatsu Narumi Shibori was begun.

Although the sophisticated technique of tie-dyeing called shibori itself dates back to the Nara period (710-794), the history of the craft here only goes back some 400 years, to when the feudal lord from the province of Bungo--now Oita Prefecture--was ordered to assist in the building of Nagoya castle.

Aichi

Nagoya Yuzen

Dyed Textiles

Owari culture was gorgeous in area that we did in the first half around current Nagoya-shi of the 18th century, and various craftsmen came and went from Kyoto. It is said that we were informed technique of yuzen at the time.

During the first half of the 18th century, Tokugawa Muneharu was the seventh in the line of leaders of the Owari clan controlling an area centered on present-day Nagoya. It was a time when the culture of the clan was flourishing and craftsmen of many types visited the area from Kyoto and elsewhere. It was then that the techniques of yuzen dyeing were introduced to the area.

Aichi

Nagoya Kuromontsuki Zome

Nagoya Black Dyeing

Dyed Textiles

It is admitted to dyehouse head of Owari by Ieyasu Tokugawa, and, around the beginning of the Edo era, clansman of Owari feudal clan which delivered area that we did around current Nagoya-shi begins in having come to make Dyed Textiles such as flag mark or flag (flag) of Owari feudal clan.

At the beginning of the 17th century, the Owari clan controlled the area centered on present-day Nagoya. It was then that the Kosakai family--one of the families of retainers--was recognized as clan dyer by the Shogun, Tokugawa Ieyasu, and the making of clan flags and banners at this time led to the establishment of this craft.

Kyoto

Kyo Kanoko Shibori

Kyoto Kanoko Shibori

Dyed Textiles

Tie-dyeing was performed for some time in Japan for one thousand several hundred years and has been used as pattern expression of Imperial Court clothes.

Shaped resist tie-dyeing, or shibori has been carried out for over a thousand years in Japan and was used for the patterns on court dress. It is known as kanoko shibori, or literally "fawn spot tie-dyeing" because of its resemblance to the spots on a young fawn.

Kyoto

Kyo Yuzen

Kyoto Yuzen Dyeing

Dyed Textiles

Dyeing technique reaches from the eighth century, and it is informed that freehand drawing yuzen was established in the Edo era by eshikyusakitomozen* of Kyoto. Popular kyusakitomozen* adopted one's style of painting in design as Ougi illustrator, and "Yuzen process" was born in field of design dyeing in what we made use of.

Although dyeing techniques had existed since the 8th century, it is said that the yuzen technique of painting dye directly onto cloth was established by Miyazaki Yuzensai, a popular fan painter living in Kyoto toward the end of the 17th century. He introduced his own style of painting as a way of rendering pattern and this led to the birth of this handpainted dyeing technique.

Kyoto

Kyo Komon

Kyoto Fine-Pattern Dyeing

Dyed Textiles

Beginning of Kyo Komon dates back 1,200 years before paper pattern becoming basics was made. When various silk fabrics were produced, after Onin War happened in the Muromachi era, crossroads ka dye in cherry blossom color and chaokusen developed, and there was Shokunincho of dyeing around Horikawa of Kyoto.

Kyo Komon dates back more than 1,200 years, when the all-essential stencil papers were first made.

Kyoto

Kyo Kuromontsuki Zome

Kyoto Black Dyeing

Dyed Textiles

What the history of kokusen was very old, and sailed up until the tenth century, but was established as kokumonfusen in the 17th century is considered that first.

Although the dyeing of cloth black has a very long history dating back to the 10th century, it seems that it was not until the 17th century that it became established as a recognized craft to include family crests.

Okinawa

Ryukyu Bingata

Ryukyu Bingata Dyeing

Dyed Textiles

Beginning of Ryukyu Bingata can date back to the mid-15th century.

The origins of Ryukyu Bingata dyeing can be traced back to the middle of the 15th century, when King Shoen was on the thrown. The court gave its unfailing patronage to the craft and according to a 1802 chronicle, Ryukyu Bingata was called a "floral cloth of the east" and was highly regarded at the market in Fuchien, China.