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TRADITIONAL CRAFTS

Aichi

Arimatsu Narumi Shibori

Arimatsu Narumi Shibori

Dyed Textiles

Technique itself of shibori is thing which began in the Nara era, but it is the time at the beginning of the Edo era that Arimatsu Narumi Shibori was begun.

Although the sophisticated technique of tie-dyeing called shibori itself dates back to the Nara period (710-794), the history of the craft here only goes back some 400 years, to when the feudal lord from the province of Bungo--now Oita Prefecture--was ordered to assist in the building of Nagoya castle.

Aichi

Nagoya Yuzen

Dyed Textiles

Owari culture was gorgeous in area that we did in the first half around current Nagoya-shi of the 18th century, and various craftsmen came and went from Kyoto. It is said that we were informed technique of yuzen at the time.

During the first half of the 18th century, Tokugawa Muneharu was the seventh in the line of leaders of the Owari clan controlling an area centered on present-day Nagoya. It was a time when the culture of the clan was flourishing and craftsmen of many types visited the area from Kyoto and elsewhere. It was then that the techniques of yuzen dyeing were introduced to the area.

Aichi

Nagoya Kuromontsuki Zome

Nagoya Black Dyeing

Dyed Textiles

It is admitted to dyehouse head of Owari by Ieyasu Tokugawa, and, around the beginning of the Edo era, clansman of Owari feudal clan which delivered area that we did around current Nagoya-shi begins in having come to make Dyed Textiles such as flag mark or flag (flag) of Owari feudal clan.

At the beginning of the 17th century, the Owari clan controlled the area centered on present-day Nagoya. It was then that the Kosakai family--one of the families of retainers--was recognized as clan dyer by the Shogun, Tokugawa Ieyasu, and the making of clan flags and banners at this time led to the establishment of this craft.

Aichi

Tokoname Yaki

Tokoname Ware

Ceramics

We can sail up until last years of Heian era, and model of Tokoname Yaki which is said to be old Tokoname Yaki is counted in one of Japanese six Old kilns. In the Heian era, we put thing which we wrote sutra of Buddhism and buried in the underground, and scripture mound pot (kyozukatsubo) to pray for benefit was made.

Pieces representing the beginnings of Tokoname Yaki were made at the end of the Heian period (794-1185) and it is now counted among Japan's six old kilns. During the Heian period, Kyozuka urns were made in which to put Buddhist sutras before burial in the ground as a way of asking favors of the Buddha. During the Muromachi period (1392-1573), the pottery produced mainly tea bowls and other tea ceremony items as well as ikebana flower vases. Jars appeared in the middle of the Edo period (1600-1868) and normal household tableware started to be produced at the end of the Edo period alongside the prized tea ceremony pieces. Sanitary items such as drain-pipes, wash-hand basin and toilets, tiles and plant pots were added to the list of products in the Meiji period (1868-1912). Undoubtedly the vast range of products available today is the result of being a production center with plentiful supplies of good quality clay to hand, and because of the area's ability to change its line of main products in step with demand down through history.

Aichi

Akazu Yaki

Akazu Ware

Ceramics

Beginning of Akazu Yaki dated back to earthenware vessel earthen vessel burnt in the Nara era (about 700), and traditional skills and techniques and name that there was established now early in the Edo era.

The origins of this ware date back to an earthenware called sueki that was made about 700, during the Nara period (710-794), although the traditional skills, techniques and nomenclature of Akazu Yaki that are still in use today were established during the early years of the Edo period (1600-1868). It was the period slightly prior to this that saw the establishment of glazing techniques that are still in use, namely shino, oribe, kizeto, and ofuke.

Aichi

Seto Sometsuke Yaki

Seto Underglazed Ware

Ceramics

Burning technology and picture technique of porcelain which native took home with him/her from Kyushu to be soft, and to put picture with moisture for of Sinicism that received instruction from specialist in picture belonging to influenced each other and, at the beginning of the 19th century, greatly developed, and skills and techniques of Seto Sometsuke Yaki was established at the mid-19th century.

At the beginning of the 19th century, local people returned from Kyushu armed with the techniques for firing porcelain and a way of applying decorations using a soft Southern Sung Dynasty style of painting with great charm that they had learned from a specialist painter.

Aichi

Nagoya Kiri Tansu

Nagoya Paulownia Chests

Woodcraft, Bamboo Craftwork

As for the Nagoya Kiri Tansu, craftsmen engaged in construction of a castle of Nagoya-jo Castle approximately 400 years ago settle down in castle town, and it is said to be opening to have made chest or large oblong chest. When living and economy of people were stable, after national unification of Tokugawa shogunate government, production of Woven textiles increased rapidly, and clothes became rich, too. Functional, rational chest was necessary in substitution for previous cabinet with general people coming to get high-quality fabrics for kimono.

It seems likely that the making of this distinctive style of paulownia chest was begun in Nagoya by craftsmen who, having been involved in the building of Nagoya castle some 400 years ago, settled there and began making chest of drawers and chests.

Aichi

Nagoya Butsudan

Nagoya Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

It was supported by warm Buddhism faith, and, in this district where the skill made with Household Buddhist Altars grew early, specialty store has already existed early in the Edo era.

Fostered by a strong belief in Buddhism, the making of these altars developed early in the area and even at the beginning of the Edo period, specialist stores dealing in home altars already existed. Skills were collectively honed by the groups of craftsmen that were created after wholesale groups were established and traditional methods and techniques were cultivated.

Aichi

Mikawa Butsudan

Mikawa Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

Beginning of Mikawa Butsudan dates back to the middle of Edo era. maridato is said to be good timber of pine, cedar, hinoki that Rev. Household Buddhist Altars is provided using transportation by water of the Yahagi River having made Household Buddhist Altars as materials with lacquer produced in the foot of Sanage (there does not seem to be monkey) in northern Mikawa at the beginning.

Mikawa Butsudan date back to the middle of the 18th century. It was then that a certain altar maker made an altar using good pine, cedar and cypress that was brought down the Yasakugawa river and finished his work using natural lacquer tapped from trees at the foot of Mt. Sarunage in the north of Mikawa.

Aichi

Owari Household Buddhist Fittings

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

Industrial art object that Owari Household Buddhist Fittings is produced around Nagoya-shi, Aichi from early period of Edo era. We developed into resources as side job of low-class samurai of high quality wood produced in the suburbs of Owari in last part of Edo era. Wooden lacquering product is the center and features a variety of processes and the colorful finish.

Aichi

Toyohashi Fude

Toyohashi Brushes

Writing tools and Abacus

Late in the Edo era, feudal lord of Yoshida feudal clan which ruled area equal to current Toyohashi-shi invites craftsman of Kyoto as goyohitsutakumi (goyofudesho) making writing brush for feudal clan, and what recommended the making of writing brush as side business to lower grade samurai does by opening.

Toyohashi is situated at the center of the area which was once ruled by the Yoshida clan. Toward the end of the 18th century, the leader of the clan brought in Suzuki Jinzaemon from Kyoto, and he began making brushes for the clan. Gradually lower ranking samurai started this work and this marked the true beginnings of the craft in Toyohashi.

Aichi

Okazaki Stonework

Okazaki Stone Carving

Stonework

Opening dates back late in the Muromachi era. In the Azuchimomoyama era, the Okazaki lord of a castle whom there was in current Aichi invited Kawachi, mason of Izumi for maintenance of castle town and let you make stone wall and moat afterwards.

The origins of this craft date back to the latter part of the Muromachi period (1391-1573). It was during the following Momoyama period (1573-1600), however, that the lord of Okazaki castle brought in skilled stone masons from Kawachi and Izumi to carry out some improvements to the surrounding town and had stone walls and moats built.