• Home
  • DENSAN Search

DENSAN Search

TRADITIONAL CRAFTS

Kumamoto

Shodai Yaki

Shodai Ware

Ceramics

Tadatoshi Hosokawa becomes change seal in Higo country from Buzen country in 1632 (Kanei 9) and ceramist source seven (the female Shojis first generation) and eight Court Security Office (the Katsuragi house first generation) which followed this are ordered potter and are broken including Shodai Yaki.

When Hosokawa Tadatoshi moved from the fief of Buzen to take control of the fief of Higo in 1632, two master potters were appointed. One of these was Genhichi, the first of a long line of potters of the Hinkoji family, and the other was Hachizaemon, the first of successive generations of potters from the Katsuragi family. It was the appointment of these two men that is said to have marked the beginnings of the making of Shodai Yaki.

Kumamoto

Amakusa Tojiki

Amakusa Pottery and Porcelain

Ceramics

In Imperial demesne Amakusa, person of village headman of each village of Shimauchi demanded way of self-support of villager from the Sue work, and porcelain and earthenware were baked from the middle in the Edo early days.

In the old fief of Amakusa on the island of Kyushu, the village headmen encouraged the people throughout the fief to try and support themselves by making pottery and from the early 17th century and on into the 18th century, both pottery and porcelain were being produced in the province.

Kumamoto

Higo Zogan

Higo Inlay

Metalworking product

It is assumed father that Matashichi Hayashi who served Marquis Tadatoshi Hosokawa who entered the country as Higo king in 1632 (Kanei 9) made inlay on the brim of gun and sword.

The roots of this craft go back to Hayashi Matashichi. With the support of the local feudal lord Hosokawa and his family, Hayashi was doing inlaid metal work on firearms and sword guards during the first half of the 17th century. Subsequently, as this craft became established, fine Higo sword guards were produced by generation after generation of the Hayashi family as well as by other families such as the Hiratas, Nishigakis, Shimizus and Kamiyoshis right through the Edo period (1600-1868), and many pieces of their work are still in existence. When the carrying of swords was outlawed in 1876, the Higo craftsmen turned their hand to decorative work and began making everyday items in line with the new social conditions.

Kumamoto

Yamaga Toro

Yamaga Toro

Other Crafts

There is, but, as for the origin, it is performed various opinions of surely with the mid-17th century being able to sail up.

There are many stories about the origin of this craft, but it is known to date back to the mid-17th century.