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TRADITIONAL CRAFTS

Tokyo

Murayama Oshima Tsumugi

Murayama Oshima Fabrics

Woven textiles

Beginning of Murayama Oshima Tsumugi is said to be in the latter half of the Edo era.

While the history of this kimono cloth only seems to date back to the middle of the 19th century, it was in 1920 that the techniques associated with two different cloths were combined to produce the silk cloth known as Murayama Oshima Tsumugi.

Tokyo

Honba Kihachijo

Kihachijo Fabrics

Woven textiles

In the old days, Norinaga Motoori left with "zururamukashi where the name of island called pseudo hachijo-silk was than that hachijo-silk".

It seems that the island of Kihachijo got its name from the Hachijo cloth, and the island was a supplier of silk right back in the Muromachi period (1392-1573). Since the middle of the 18th century, very elegant striped and checked cloths have been woven on the island, and these kimono cloths and obi still have many followers today.

Tokyo

Tama Ori

Tama Fabrics

Woven textiles

In area equal to current Hachioji, silk was woven from end of the Heian era, and there was Woven textiles such as Takiyama pongee and Yokoyama pongee.

Two silk cloths known as Takiyama pongee and Yokoyama pongee were being made toward the end of the 12th century, in the area of present-day Hachioji on the western edge of Tokyo.

Tokyo

Tokyo Some Komon

Tokyo Fine-Pattern Dyeing

Dyed Textiles

Beginning of fine pattern can date back to the Muromachi era, but it is the Edo era, and it is after that fine pattern came to be dyed widely.

Although the history of this craft can be traced back to the Muromachi period (1392-1573), it was not until the Edo period (1600-1868) that cloth of this type was produced in any quantity. Stencil-dyed cloths were especially used for the kamishimo, a piece of formal dress worn by the Daimyo. These regional feudal lords were required to reside in Edo for long periods and the resulting increase in demand for this cloth made Edo the center of its production. Originally, it was only the Daimyo and samurai classes who wore garments of this cloth.

Tokyo

Tokyo Tegaki Yuzen

Tokyo Yuzen Dyeing

Dyed Textiles

It was in the middle of the Edo era, and products from the Kansai area said to be "outbound thing" gathered in Edo where culture and economy prospered together as the center of military administration a lot. Of such times there are many personal dyers (dye, and do) of daimyo, and one comes to move to Edo to drift,

By the 18th century, Edo was the center of political power of the Shogunate and the culture and economy of this metropolis that later became Tokyo flourished.

Tokyo

Edo Wazao

Edo Fishing Rods

Woodcraft, Bamboo Craftwork

Edo Wazao has begun to be made with jointed fishing rod made using natural bamboo in Edo in the middle of Edo era. Late in the Edo era, we reached level to be able to call arts and crafts, and today's Edo Wazao was completed.

Edo Wazao have always been made from natural culms (stems) of bamboo and were first made in Edo (Tokyo) in the middle of the Edo period (1600-1868). By the end of this era, they had taken on their present-day form and can truly be called works of art. With the sea on their doorstep and some beautiful rivers, too, these rods were a crystallization of research into the needs of those who lived in Edo and loved to fish.

Tokyo

Edo Sashimono

Edo Joinery

Woodcraft, Bamboo Craftwork

In the Edo era, Tokugawa shogunate government called many craftsmen together from the whole country and we made Shokunincho of Daikumachi, Kajicho, Konnyacho and, around Kanda, Nihonbashi, developed the manual industry.

Many skilled individuals were encouraged to live and work in Edo (Tokyo) by the Shogunate right from the outset of the Edo period (1600-1868), and craft industries developed as a result of the formation of enclaves within the districts of Kanda and Nihonbashi for such specialists as carpenters, smiths, and dyers.

Tokyo

Tokyo Ginki

Tokyo Silversmithery

Metalworking product

It was in the middle of the Edo era, and it was beginning of "Tokyo Ginki" that silverware craftsman called silversmith (we do and do Gane) and decoration craftsman called Rev. metalworking to make comb, ornamental hairpin, God interest (mikoshi portable shrine) metal fittings appeared as creator of cloth for instrument which profiler engraved.

This craft began during the 18th century with the emergence of three kinds of skilled workers of precious metals. First there was the shirogane-shi, who fashioned articles that were then skillfully chased by masters of this technique; and then there were skilled metal workers who made such things as combs, hairpins (kanzashi) and the decorative metal fittings for the portable shrines or mikoshi.

Tokyo

Tokyo antimony industrial art object

Tokyo Antimony Craft

Metalworking product

It was casting product which assumed antimony which was alloy of lead, antimony, tin raw materials, and technique established Tokyo antimony as local industry of Tokyo early in the Meiji era. We make use of delicate design and sculpture, and accessories, prize cup, ornament are made.

Tokyo Antimony is a cast metal craft that uses an alloy made from lead, antimony, and tin. This craft was established in Tokyo as a local industry in the early Meiji period (1868 - 1912). The detailed patterns and engravings are used for decorations, trophies, ornaments, and more.

Saitama Tokyo

Edo Kimekomi Ningyo

Edo Art Dolls

Dolls and Kokeshi

Shinto priesthood makes small doll of wooden sculpture with remnants of tree of willow which is materials of wicker box (yanagibako) to be in the middle of the Edo era, and to use for sacred rites in Kamigamo, Kyoto Shrine and touches groove, and maridato is said to be what we catch remaining cloth of clothes of Shinto priesthood there and help put on and touched at the beginning.

In the middle of the Edo period (1600-1868), a priest called Takahashi Tadashige is said to have been very proud of a small wooden doll that he had carved from scraps of willow which were left over from boxes used in a festival at Kamigamo shrine in Kyoto. Then using remnants of fabric from his priest's clothing, he dressed the doll by inserting the ends of the fabric into the wooden torso.

Tokyo

Edo Sekku Ningyo

Edo Sekku Ningyo

Dolls and Kokeshi

Doll production of Edo began under the influence of Kyoto early in the Edo era, but, as for Edo's original style having been established, it is thought with Horyaku approximately 250 years ago. Doll and doll for the Boy's Festival were realistic, and, from this time, they became refined Edo-style figure. Doll culture of Edo met the golden age for the culture civil administration period that was in the latter half of the Edo era, and former decoration which we decorated outdoors early in the Edo era was decorated indoors, and Edo armor of precise decoration which made doll for the Boy's Festival and real armor model was made.

Edo doll production began in the early Edo period (1600s) due to influence from Kyoto, but the unique Edo style is said to have begun 250 years ago in the Horeki era.

Tokyo

Edo Karakami

Edo Decorative Papers

Other Crafts

The karakamino source dated back to draft of tanka writing paper which transcripted 31-syllable Japanese poem of the Heian era, but came to be put on sliding paper-door or screen the Middle Ages later. Demand increased and accomplished original development while citizen-based town planning of Edo by Tokugawa shogunate government advanced in the Edo era.

The origin of these decorative papers dates back to a type of paper used during the Heian period (794-1185) to write out the traditional style of poem called a waka. Nevertheless, it was not until the Middle Ages that decorative papers were applied to free-standing screens and were stretched over the sliding screens called fusuma dividing interior space.