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TRADITIONAL CRAFTS

Yamaguchi

Ouchi Nuri

Ouchi Lacquer Ware

Laquer Ware

When Ouchi who had power around current Yamaguchi in the Muromachi era pushes forward trade with Korea and Chugoku in the light times, as for the Ouchi Nuri, what we recommended as important export is said to be opening.

During the Muromachi period (1392-1573), Ouchi, who was a prominent figure in the area corresponding to present-day Yamaguchi Prefecture, promoted trade with Korea and Ming dynasty China. He encouraged the making of this particular lacquer ware for export and, although this trade finally died out, the skills which had been learned were carried over into the Edo period (1600-1868), and are still with us today.

Kanagawa

Kamakura Bori

Kamakura Carved and Lacquered Ware

Laquer Ware

When denomination of Buddhism called Zen Buddhism came from Chugoku in the Kamakura era, much art industrial art objects have been imported together.

When Zen Buddhism was introduced from China during the Kamakura period (1185-1333), many arts and crafts were imported at the same time. Sculptors of Buddhist images and carpenters who built temples and shrines were influenced by examples of carved lacquer ware called tsuishu and tsuikoku that were amongst these Chinese imports.

Kyoto

Kyo Kanoko Shibori

Kyoto Kanoko Shibori

Dyed Textiles

Tie-dyeing was performed for some time in Japan for one thousand several hundred years and has been used as pattern expression of Imperial Court clothes.

Shaped resist tie-dyeing, or shibori has been carried out for over a thousand years in Japan and was used for the patterns on court dress. It is known as kanoko shibori, or literally "fawn spot tie-dyeing" because of its resemblance to the spots on a young fawn.

Tokyo

Edo Sashimono

Edo Joinery

Woodcraft, Bamboo Craftwork

In the Edo era, Tokugawa shogunate government called many craftsmen together from the whole country and we made Shokunincho of Daikumachi, Kajicho, Konnyacho and, around Kanda, Nihonbashi, developed the manual industry.

Many skilled individuals were encouraged to live and work in Edo (Tokyo) by the Shogunate right from the outset of the Edo period (1600-1868), and craft industries developed as a result of the formation of enclaves within the districts of Kanda and Nihonbashi for such specialists as carpenters, smiths, and dyers.

Ishikawa

Wajima Nuri

Wajima Lacquer Ware

Laquer Ware

It is "door (shunuritobira) where the oldest thing was made with Wajima Nuri in the Muromachi era painted in red", but, by remains investigations, Laquer Ware and tool in the Kamakura era are found,

Although the oldest piece of Wajima Nuri is the shunuri-tobira made in the Muromachi period (1392-1573), other items and tools have been found during surveys of archaeological sites that date back to the Kamakura period (1185-1333). Lacquer ware is therefore known to have been made much earlier. During the Edo period (1600-1868), Wajima Nuri was known for its durability and was being used in the homes of farmers and merchants up and down the country. By the end of the 19th century it was also being used in restaurants and inns and designs gradually became grander and more decorative.

Osaka

Sakai Uchihamono

Sakai Forged Blades

Metalworking product

Gun, cigarette were transmitted by middle part, Portuguese of the 16th century. Because "cigarette kitchen knife" which ticked away tobacco leaves came to be made in Sakai in the latter half of the 16th century, and Tokugawa shogunate government gave Sakai seal of quality proof called "hallmark" and admitted monopoly, the sharpness and fame of Sakai knife opened to whole country each place.

Guns and tobacco were introduced into Japan in the middle of the 16th century by the Portuguese. By the end of that century, small tobacco knives were being forged in Sakai and the Tokugawa Shogunate awarded the forgers of Sakai a special seal of approval and guarantee of their quality.

Kyoto

Kyo Yuzen

Kyoto Yuzen Dyeing

Dyed Textiles

Dyeing technique reaches from the eighth century, and it is informed that freehand drawing yuzen was established in the Edo era by eshikyusakitomozen* of Kyoto. Popular kyusakitomozen* adopted one's style of painting in design as Ougi illustrator, and "Yuzen process" was born in field of design dyeing in what we made use of.

Although dyeing techniques had existed since the 8th century, it is said that the yuzen technique of painting dye directly onto cloth was established by Miyazaki Yuzensai, a popular fan painter living in Kyoto toward the end of the 17th century. He introduced his own style of painting as a way of rendering pattern and this led to the birth of this handpainted dyeing technique.

Yamanashi

Koshu Suisho Kiseki Zaiku

Koshu Crystal Carving

Semiprecious Stone Craftwork

It does by opening that crystal uncut stone was discovered in interior of known "gotakenoborisenkyo" by beautiful view approximately 1,000 years ago.

This craft started some one thousand years ago, after quartz was found near Mount Kinpu beyond Mitakeshosenkyo, which is famous for its beautiful views. When it was first discovered, it was used as an ornament but by the middle of the Edo period (1600-1868), Shinto priests were taking the raw material to Kyoto to have them made into gems.

Ishikawa

Kanazawa Butsudan

Kanazawa Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

Beginning of Kanazawa Butsudan can date back until the 17th century.

It is possible to trace the origins of Kanazawa Butsudan back to the 17th century. What prompted their production was the sheer number of people who had been converted to the Jodo Shinshu in the Hokuriku region of Japan, after Rennyo-shonin, a Buddhist priest of the same order visited the area to spread the word.

Nagano

Iiyama Butsudan

Iiyama Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

As for the making of Household Buddhist Altars which rooted in town Iiyama of temple from the early period of Edo era, work is subdivided and is produced from parts to assembling consistently in area. Around Household Buddhist Altars shop which should be called production wholesale dealer of Household Buddhist Altars which served as Rev. finish, production center is comprised.

The making of Buddhist household altars became firmly established in the thriving religious community of Iiyama during the beginning of the 17th century. All of the work was done in the area by different craftsmen and then the whole thing was assembled.

Kyoto

Kyo Butsudan

Kyoto Household Buddhist Altars

Household Buddhist Altars and Fittings

Household Buddhist Altars was thing which varied from Buddhist altar (zushi) to, but was used as thing of samurai exclusively.

Household Buddhist altars were a variation of miniature shrines called zushi and were originally used exclusively by the warrior classes. It is thought that the production of ordinary household altars began in earnest with an increase in the numbers of people requiring one at the beginning of the Edo period (1600-1868), when the Tokugawa Shogunate introduced new religious policies.

Oita

Beppu Take Zaiku

Beppu Bamboo Basketry

Woodcraft, Bamboo Craftwork

It is considered to be opening that product put basket for peddling on sale in the Muromachi era. In the Edo era, the name of Beppu Onsen spread out, and kitchen utensils which visitor of hot spring used during stay were made. As these came to be taken to go as souvenir, a lot of bamboo works came to be made and became local industry around Beppu.

The making of bamboo baskets for sale by travelling peddlers during the Muromachi period (1392-1573), marked the beginnings of this craft.